webinar register page

Webinar banner
Wearable Light Loggers: From Optical Radiation to Health-Related Metrics
The past decades have generated compelling laboratory evidence showing that light exposure profoundly impacts on human circadian physiology through a pathway connecting a subset of ganglion cells in the retina to the hypothalamus. While these laboratory studies generally demonstrate the biological capacity of non-visual photoreceptive pathways to respond to light, the significance and relevance of light exposure in the real world does not immediately follow from "biological capacity" studies. One key component for understanding the impact of light exposure in the real world is measuring patterns of light exposure. In the past years, wearable light loggers have become available to accomplish this task. In this webinar hosted by the Color Technical Group, Manuel Spitschan will review new developments in this area and discuss challenges and research gaps that need to be addressed.

Subject Matter Level: Introductory - Assumes little previous knowledge of the topic

What You Will Learn:
• Approaches to measuring light exposure in the real world
• Challenges for measuring light exposure

Who Should Attend:
• Vision scientists, psychologists, neuroscientists and lighting scientists at all career levels
• Professionals and practitioners in other fields interested in light exposure

Sep 20, 2022 01:00 PM in Eastern Time (US and Canada)

* Required information
Loading
Optica Code of Conduct and Anti-Harassment Policy: In order to preserve a climate that encourages both civil and fruitful dialogue, we reserve the right to suspend or terminate participation for anyone who violates the Optica Code of Conduct. For complete policy information, visit optica.org/codeofconduct.

Speakers

Manuel Spitschan
@Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics & Technical University of Munich
Prof Dr. Manuel Spitschan leads the Max Planck Research Group "Translational Sensory & Circadian Neuroscience" at the Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics and holds the professorship "Chronobiology & Health" at the Technical University of Munich. After undergraduate studies in psychology at the University of St. Andrews (2009-2012) and doctoral study at the University of Pennsylvania (2012-2016), he was first a postdoctoral researcher at Stanford University (2016-2017) and then joined the University of Oxford as a Sir Henry Wellcome Fellow (2017-2021) and University Research Lecturer (2020-2021). His research focuses on understanding the visual and non-visual impact of light on people. He was Chair of the Color Technical Group from 2018 and 2020 and is active the Daylight Academy and several CIE committees.